Posts Tagged "music"

Tech Memento Mori

When this happened, I was thinking that I wish I had a t-shirt. So I decided to just write in on a whim to ask. Lo and behold, I got a reply pretty quickly – and got sent a shirt in the mail several days later.

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Goodbye, Rdio

While Spotify is the main streaming service in the US (which still baffles me), I chose Rdio because I just preferred Rdio’s interface. I tried Spotify initially, and just found myself confused as to how to navigate songs and collections. Going to Rdio after Spotify was like a breath of fresh air. Clean, intuitive. Well designed.

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Helios: Yume

Yume is an interactive song that you can control in your browser. Created by White Vinyl, you can move some of the elements on the page to adjust the volume of various samples.

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Sufjan Stevens: Death with Dignity

I don’t think I know Sufjan Stevens’ music enough to call myself a fan, but when I find a song I like by him… I really fall for it. I heard he had a new album out called Carrie & Lowell, and I’ve been listening to it (the whole album) pretty nonstop, while I’m working on my computer at home….

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Why We Love Repetition in Music

“Repetition can actually shift your perceptual circuitry such that the segment of sound is heard as music: not thought about as similar to music, or contemplated in reference to music, but actually experienced as if the words were being sung.”

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JD McPherson: Let the Good Times Roll

The title track is the one that really caught my ear. His music is reminiscent of an earlier age, which I’d be able to identify more accurately if I wasn’t so out of touch with music history. Give the song a listen, and you’ll see/hear what I mean.

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Patatap: Keyboard Powered Music Maker

It’s a very clean and simple page, and a lot of fun to play with. Took me a try or two before I realized that the space bar shifted everything into a new grouping. It would be interesting to be able to paste in short sentences, so that everyone could “hear” what a certain phrase sounded like.

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